Category Archives: Moon

DECEMBER LONG NIGHTS FULL MOON – SUPERMOON

The December full moon is called the Long Night’s Full Moon because midwinter nights are at their longest and darkest and the full moon is seen above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full moon has a high trajectory across the sky because at this time the sun is low in the sky.
December full moon is also known as the Full Moon before Yule, thus I have illustrated this moon with a huge bonfire on a Yule log. And this moon is also known as the Full Cold Moon, too.
On Sunday, December 3, 2017, this full moon is also the year’s one and only full supermoon. This December moon comes close enough to Earth (222,443 miles or 357,987 km) to enjoy supermoon status. This makes the full moon look extra close and extra bright.
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FULL MOON NOVEMBER – BEAVER MOON!

WINTER IS COMING!  THE FULL MOON IN NOVEMBER IS CALLED THE BEAVER MOON!  Beavers are hard at work preparing for the coming winter.  Native Americans set beaver traps at this time before the winter freeze so that they would have winter furs to keep them warm.  This November full moon is also called the FROSTY MOON. 

 – This is one of 12 watercolor illustrations of Full Moons throughout the year.

FULL HUNTER’S MOON (HARVEST MOON) – OCTOBER

FULL HUNTER’S MOON – OCTOBER – This year the Harvest Moon actually was in September because that’s when it was the closest to Autumn Equinox.  Therefore, October’s full moon is called the Hunter’s Moon this year!  When October’s Full Moon follows a September Harvest Moon, it is also called the Blood Moon or Sanguine Moon. 

The Full Hunter’s Moon gets it’s name from the Native American Indians.  Fields of grain have been reaped and deer & foxes come out at night to eat the leftover fallen grain to fatten up for the coming winter.  When the Full Hunter’s Moon rises, the moon light shines through the bare tree branches & hunter’s can easily see the animals coming out of the forest.  Native Americans hunted during this full moon to store up meat to see them through the long winter.  Western Europe and many Native American tribes celebrate the Full Hunter’s Moon as an important feast day.